Monday, February 07, 2005

 

Iman al-Hams investigation starts to fall apart

Iman al-Hams, the 13-year-old girl who was shot multiple times in Gaza last year is still dead. And there is little question about who her killer was. Indeed, he claimed that he was right to kill her. But now, as the investigation presses forward, the prosecution's key witness has told the court that he lied in his previous testimony. Now the killer has been released and given his firearm back. This is bad news for anybody who thought that justice would be brought to the killer through his guilt being exposed through an IDF investigation. Indeed, this serves only to throw the entire IDF investigation process into question. But Iman al-Hams remains dead. And those bullets didn't get into her by themselves.

UPDATE: There is a spectacularly damning piece by Amira Hass in Ha'aretz today (9 February 2005). I'll excerpt the final paragraph:
If the Palestinians had warplanes and tanks so their killing was sterile, they would prefer to use those. And then, even if they killed Jewish civilians, they would not be called murderers with blood on their hands but enemy soldiers. And when caught they would be considered prisoners of war. If the policy makers of the Olso Accords really were thinking about peace the way they are said to have been, they would have freed all those prisoners. But then, like now: those who speak about gestures and then only free Marwan Barghouti's son, even if it was at Abbas' request, continue to operate with the old diskette of the colonialist who throws candy to the natives.

Comments:
As a commentor on my blog said in response to this...

"Words fail; I have nothing."

Yet another innocent victim of this conflict, who died for no reason whatsoever. Congrats, Mr. Sharon.

Justice? Perish the thought. She wasn't even Israeli.
 
It is my hope-fantasy that someone will stand up at last to say no more. Just some anonymous someone who has been living a life of decency and who has the power of speech -- I think that that is all it takes, really. That and perseverance.

Or maybe it will be a convergence of all the small groups of various people working to make daily life possible for both Israelis and Palestinians. Maybe. Like Rachel Corrie's mom and dad and so many others who have decided to make their loss have meaning by trying to change the situation, offering hope to both the dispossessed and the grasping.

So all the waste and guilt can stop. That would be good.

Aunt Deb
 
well i'm with you in part aunt deb, but i don't think it can be somebody anonymous and decent. because there are, i think, people doing that every day. and there is such an immense inertia working against them (back to the idea of the referendum and the status quo, eh?). so i guess my fantasy is not that somebody will stand up for what's right and decent, but that somebody will listen.
 
Staying what you name "decent" appears mutually exclusive with speaking out - what does the most decent life mean once you are accused of partisanship, or worse, racism?

The dilemma here is not that nobody with the authority and justification to speak out will do so, but that we have developed a system in which anyone who speaks out is discredited immediately. Such is the paradox of our time, and I have no idea how to break through it...
 
i was just browsing through the blog world searching for the keyword posters and it brought me to your site. You have a great site however it is not exactly what i was looking for. Good luck on your site. sincerely, antonio.
 
i was just browsing through the blog world searching for the keyword posters and it brought me to your site. You have a great site however it is not exactly what i was looking for. Good luck on your site. sincerely, antonio.
 
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